54 Daybridge with IPS

16.50
LENGTH
3
CABINS
6
GUESTS

The surface below the surface

As you well know, the geometry beneath any planing powerboat is crucial to performance.

Belize was never going to make do with some off-the-shelf version, nor even settle for creating their own in the absence of propulsion data.

First prize, really, is to design in conjunction with the particular drive setup a boat will have.

Because Cummins Zeus pod drives had been agreed upon for the 54, the boat’s running surface was primarily penned on that specific basis. First, by Ocean Yacht Designs, then reviewed by Cummins’s own in-house naval architects.

Subtle signs

The superstructure shape on the Belize is also somewhat less bluff than traditional predecessors. The coach roof is angled just enough to shed headwinds and shrug off spray, but upright enough to provide good volume in passenger spaces.

Note too the way the roofline swoops down, ever so gradually, almost to mid-cockpit.

Elsewhere, visual cues recall art deco influenced boats of the 20’s and 30’s (when they were referred to as ‘gentlemen’s launches’).

A more gracious time and place

As the cradle of our civilisation, Europe still— quite deservedly— influences our design sensibility. Even so, we tend to take it with a grain of salt.

We try to cherry-pick and adapt ideas to suit different cruising distances, light levels and lifestyles, in many locations.

Virtual Tour

Performance

Harnessing technology

The sense of any classical or retro references quickly disappear when we examine the technical side of the 54.

There’s nothing at all nostalgic or backward-glancing about resin-infused composite construction, double vinylester outer skin, or watertight, stepped collision bulkhead and independent foam-filled hull compartments. Or a deck both screwed and glued to the hull, with the final seam girded by a full-perimeter 60mm 316 stainless steel rub rail.

Specifications

Price
POA
Brand
Riviera
Model
54 Daybridge with IPS
Dimensions
16.50